Good Neighbors. Great Lawyers.

Consumer Law

Recommended Lawyers:

| Cheryl M. Gill | Brian G. Weber | Joseph G. Veenstra | Brandon J. Prinsen | Anthony R. Gingrasso | Heidi M. Eglash |

Johns, Flaherty & Collins attorneys represent consumers in a broad range of areas.

We assist clients in:

  • Bankruptcy matters
  • Billing and contract disputes
  • Civil rights
  • Class action lawsuits
  • Constitutional law
  • Land ownership and use
  • Landlord-tenant law
  • Privacy
  • Product safety and liability
  • Professional liability
  • Real estate transactions

Representative Matters

When several people became ill after eating at the same Vernon County restaurant over the same weekend, authorities found salmonella contamination in the kitchen, a result of cross-contamination. Johns, Flaherty & Collins filed a class-action lawsuit on behalf of consumers. The case, representing more than 300 class members, was settled in just 14 months for $1.25 million.


An African American man was pulled over for an alleged traffic violation. Dash cam video from the officer's care proved no apparent reason for the stop, but the officer nevertheless removed him from the vehicle and brought in a drug-sniffing dog that "hit" on the vehicle. The officer then tore apart the car, causing nearly $1,000 damage, looking for drugs while the driver stood outside in cold, winter rain. No drugs were found, but the officer eventually cited the driver for a #1 Dad emblem hanging from his mirror. Johns, Flaherty & Collins settled the case, covering the damage plus attorneys' fees and costs.


Johns, Flaherty & Collins represented a member of the military who was called to duty in the Middle East. The soldier left and finished his apartment lease. The landlord kept the security deposit and provided no notice for the action. The landlord further did not respond to requests for the return of the deposit. The soldier sued the landlord and received double the security deposit plus attorneys' fees and costs.


Johns, Flaherty & Collins represented a couple who had purchase a new recreational vehicle that had persistent problem. Because the couple had taken it back to the dealer for repairs within the specified, allowable timeframe, we were able to sue the retailer and the manufacturer under the lemon law. The case settled at mediation, awarding the couple more than they had paid for the RV.